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Rolling Stone, Campus Sexual Assault, and Know Your IX

A recent controversy about Rolling Stone's article about sexual assault at the University of Virginia, and the magazine's subsequent retraction of that article, has sparked lots of conversation about sexual assault on college campuses.  Rolling Stone's handling of the situation was regrettable.  But in the maelstrom of criticism, it's important to remember that the epidemic of sexual assault on college campuses is real.  At least 85 colleges or universities are under investigation due to concerns about how they handled allegations of sexual assault.  Too few campuses are doing the work of not only overhauling policies, but changing a culture on campus that normalizes sexual assault and blames survivors rather than perpetrators.

Our friends at Know Your IX, a national student campaign against gender-based violence, wrote this piece for MSNBC:

"Here’s the thing: Campus violence is very real. The national effort to address these harms has been heavily reported, but the rape, harassment, abuse, and assault started long before journalists turned their attention to our lives. They occur now whether or not you believe Jackie or any other student. But I hope you do.

If we spent all the energy we expend questioning survivors instead preventing violence, just imagine the impact we could have."

Read the full article

 

 
Ensuring Young People’s Access to Preventive Services in the Affordable Care Act

Check out this important new publication!

Young people need access to a full range of sexual and reproductive health care services. By requiring most health plans to cover preventive services without cost sharing, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) holds the potential to make many critical healthcare services more accessible to young people, including screenings for sexually transmitted infections and HIV, contraceptive care, pregnancy-related care, and HPV immunizations, among other services. Additionally, the ACA has made it possible for many young people to stay on their parents’ plans up to age 26, and those with income under 133 percent of the Federal Poverty Level are eligible for Medicaid coverage.Since young people ages 15 to 24 are more likely to experience unintended pregnancy and STIs than most other age groups,increased access to these services has the potential to make a real difference in many young people’s lives. In fact, it already has: since the implementation of the ACA, young people are significantly more likely to receive a routine examination including preventive care services.

But at the policy level, a number of challenges exist to successful implementation of the preventive services provisions of the ACA, especially those pertaining to reproductive and sexual health. 

Read more

 
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